Welcome to WritersReign website

Short Story Competitions

Poetry Competitions

Amazon Best Sellers

WritersReign - Welcome WR Short Story Comp Writing Competitions WR Past Winners Writing News Article Archive Writer's Questions Useful Links for Writers Software for Writers Writing Courses What is RSS? Magazines for Writers Contact

Kindle Kash

The 10 Day E-book

How to Write a Children’s Book

The Wealthy Writer

Write a Novel in a Month

Essential English

Self-Publishing Secrets

WritersReign Supports the Sunflower Fellowship Romania

1and1.co.uk
Web Hosting

The Speed Reading Secret

Follow us:

Blogging for Writers

This Month's Feature Article

“21st Century Freelancing: 8 Reasons It Is Great to Be a Modern Day Writer”


 
By Greg Walker

The idea of writing for a living has been a popular one for many people over the years, but it has to be said that people who want to be writers are now in a better position than ever before.

Here are eight reasons why, right now in the 21st century, writers have never had it so good.

1.  It's Easier

Writing is always hard work. But the ability to make a living from it is most certainly easier.

In the past you needed to have connections to make it as a writer; before that, a high level of education was a prerequisite. Now you just need to be able to string a few sentences together and you can potentially make a career out of writing.

Despite the fact that there is a lot more competition now than there used to be, for those people with the talent and dedication to make a go of it, the opportunities are endless.

2.  More Demand

One of the reasons why it is so much easier for people to make a living from writing these days is that there is so much more demand.

The birth of the internet has led to a huge rise in the number of options available for writers. No longer are you restricted to writing for newspapers or magazines, or putting together a bestseller: Now demand exists everywhere.

The market for web content writing alone is vast and growing, and as the world continues to go online, the opportunities will only increase.

You can even use your writing skills to cut out clients completely. Set up a few money-making websites and let advertisers pay your bills, or write your own eBook and start selling copies from Amazon without an agent or publisher in sight.

With more demand and more opportunities, anyone who wants to write for a living should be feeling very smug right now.

3.  Clients, Clients, Everywhere

With many businesses, it's recommended that you start by finding clients in your home area. There's certainly no harm in that, and for certain types of business it may be essential, or at least not a bad idea.

However, when you write for a living, the world is your oyster.

I have clients in four different continents at this very moment, and I've worked for clients in every continent bar Antarctica. And that is by no means unusual: Many people who work as writers have clients all over the world, even in countries where English is not the first language.

When you have millions of potential clients, the opportunities are only restricted by what you make of them.

4.  Constant Source of Inspiration

Many people talk about the fact that with access to the internet you have a fountain of knowledge at your fingertips, free encyclopaedias packed with knowledge on every subject imaginable, which makes it a lot easier to write on unfamiliar topics.

Whilst that is certainly true, I prefer to think of the internet as a source of inspiration.

Online you have millions of images and videos of every place, event, and experience imaginable just a click away, this can really help to get the creative juices flowing.

You also have up-to-the-minute ideas and resources coming through on Twitter all day long, and when you get stuck you can post a question to your Facebook network and get ideas from friends and acquaintances around the world that you would never have thought of yourself.

The internet makes getting inspired easy.

5.  Different Ways to Write

First, there was the quill.

Then came the pen.

Then the typewriter.

Then computers.

Then tablets.

You can use whichever writing tool works best for you. Although most modern writers probably use a computer, there is no reason why you should have to stick to this.

There is no need to even use a keyboard any longer. There is some pretty good dictation software out there these days, and although it takes a bit of getting used to, it can sure make things easier and help to prevent those pesky repetitive strain injuries becoming a problem.

6.  Simple Backups

Imagine spending two years writing a manuscript out on paper… and then losing it. That was a real risk Way Back When, but now you never have to worry about losing your work ever again.

Now you can back up your work constantly to your Dropbox folder, whether from your notebook, iPad, or mobile phone, so that you always have access to a copy. Apple's OS 'Mountain Lion' even saves your work as you type, so you don't even have to worry about losing the odd paragraph of text any more.

7.  Write From Anywhere

To be honest, you could always write from anywhere using a pen and paper. But now you can make a living from anywhere whilst you are out and about and moving around.

You can pick up contracts wherever you can access your emails, carry out your research online, send prospective emails to new clients, carry out all your banking… and all whilst out in the field.

8.  More Sources of Help

Writers have always needed help and support from other writers, but now this is easier than ever to find. Wherever you are in the world, you can instantly connect to online forums, social networks, writers' groups, and even the comments sections of popular blogs, to find help, advice, tips, and support.

Even if you spend every hour of your working day physically alone, you are never really alone as a writer.

Things Can Only Get Better

I honestly believe that there has never been a better time to be a writer. All of the above reasons mean that if you are thinking about making writing into a career, you have fewer obstacles in your way than ever before.

We are in the ‘information age', and the opportunities for writers have never been greater. And, in my humble opinion, things are only going to get better.

-----------------------------------------

Do you want to become a writer? Now that it's a better time than ever before to get started, what's stopping you? Greg Walker has set up the website http://ProWebWriting.com where you can learn the tricks involved in finding better clients and regular work within weeks. You'll find free emails, lots of advice, a free eBook, and more to get you going, so check it out and start your writing career today.


DOWNLOAD THIS ARTICLE IN PDF FORMAT

WritersReign Short Story Competition 2015 Now Open!

© WritersReign.uk - Welcome to WritersReign

WritersReign is Hosted by 1and1.co.uk

A Message from Your Editor

May I wish all my visitors a very happy, prosperous, and successful 2015.

Make it your aim this year to nail that project be it a story, article, novel, biography, poetry collection, or whatever, because you CAN do it!

Steady persistance is the key to all endeavours.

Don’t give up! You WILL make it. Watch this month’s video above.

Mervyn Love, Editor

To contact us by email
Click Here

Need Help With Your Writing?

Writersreign offers two F*R*E*E* courses.
You can sign up in the forms below, or for more information:

CREATIVE COURSE
ARTICLE COURSE


Recommended Giveaways

What's the catch? None really, you just sign up to the associated newsletter and that gives you access to the goodies.

So click on one or more below and be amazed.

Writers Giveaway

Software Giveaway

If you're into Self-help/Self Growth, you'll love this:

Self-Growth Giveaway

WritersReign

Article Writing Course 

We respect your email privacy

WritersReign Creative Writing Course 

We respect your email privacy

Southend-on-Sea in the Great War by Frances Clamp
Frances is a friend of mine and has just had this excellent book published.
More details here. (Ed.)

This Month’s Video
George Weir on How to Write Fiction Stories